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tv   Click  BBC News  November 26, 2023 4:30am-5:01am GMT

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plane? i plane? lam plane? i am on board the ferry that can fly! why has nobody made an electric hydrofoil, flying very before? i think the main reason is it is very hard! we are in india where solar dryers are battling food waste. and denying the sky on energy use. nice outfit by the way. thank you. i'm taking the world temperature to assess climate action. stockholm, capital of sweden and the city of islands, 14 of them to be precise which makes water transport a big thing around these parts. so today i have decided to take the ferry.
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but this is no ordinary ferry. because this very can fly. —— very. —— ferry! this is the candle appear 12, the prototype of a ferry which would go into service injuly 2024 and its cruising speed of 25 knots and wings called hydrofoils provide huge amounts of lived in the same way that aircraft wings can get a plane off the ground, these wings can raise the whole hull above the surface. i started to notice more and more boats and even windsurfing and kite surfing having these foils underneath the board so the entire thing can lift out of the water. because hardly any of the boat is having to push through the
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water, it does not need as powerful a motorcar. that means there is something else that is very special about this craft. it is electric. these small propellers are all that i needed to get the ferry up to speed and is on—board batteries give it a range of 50 nautical miles, all of which promises to make waterborne transport a whole lot cleaner and a whole lot greener. whole lot cleaner and a whole lot greener-— lot greener. normal boats consume _ lot greener. normal boats consume an _ lot greener. normal boats consume an awful- lot greener. normal boats consume an awful lot - lot greener. normal boats consume an awful lot of l lot greener. normal boats l consume an awful lot of fuel and are extremely inefficient compared to land—based transport. compared to land-based transmut— compared to land-based transort. �* , , transport. because the boat is wron: to transport. because the boat is wrong to push _ transport. because the boat is wrong to push its _ transport. because the boat is wrong to push its wake - transport. because the boat is| wrong to push its wake through the water and much resistance? a lot of resistance and you can use batteries on ferries if they are done very slowly but if you want to go a bit faster in a big longer, the whole thing collapses because you could of course put in more batteries but at the end you are putting in so many batteries the boat will think. you have a fiscal limit that
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you can't get around. he says that one — you can't get around. he says that one hour— you can't get around. he says that one hour of— you can't get around. he says that one hour of charging - you can't get around. he says that one hour of charging will| that one hour of charging will allow this ferry to run for three hours, meaning a good service communities during the morning rush on one charge to be ready for the afternoon peak after being recharged at lunchtime. another advantage to being almost entirely out of the water as well, it does not bounce about on the waves! it is pretty steady. i can't really tell i am out of the water but i can tell i can feel the of something around but actually it is using the same hydrofoil technologies that you can see it is out of the water which means... and look at him he's having the time of life out there! but whereas the speedboat is built for pleasure, leisure and basically showing off, the ferry is being pitched as a way of making
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waterborne public transport competitive in fuel costs and environmental costs as well. because as well as not feeling the waves, it does not make them, either, meaning it's good for everything that lives here. traditional ferries create big wakes and when it drives in our sensitive archipelago it is a sensitive archipelago it is a sensitive ecosystem with marine life and the birds and the fish, it causes erosion from the shorelines. that is a really big challenge for us. we need to reduce the wakes to be able to drive in a more sustainable way in our sensitive environment. the principle — sensitive environment. the principle of _ sensitive environment. the principle of hydro - sensitive environment. the principle of hydro filing is not that new but it has only been recently possible to do in this way. the first reason is that we now have materials that are up to the job. you that we now have materials that are up to the job.— are up to the “ob. you need thin blades, — are up to the job. you need thin blades, made - are up to the job. you need thin blades, made super. are up to the job. you need - thin blades, made super strong but very thin do not create too
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much drag. typically they use carbon fibre, a perfect material and it can build them in fairly small volumes otherwise you would have to rely on steel, it becomes heavy and costly to manufacture. the second reason _ and costly to manufacture. the second reason is _ and costly to manufacture. the second reason is the high—end computation going on below deck. this is the science bit. when you raise a boat almost entirely out of the water, it becomes unstable because you have all the weight up here above the wings that it is balancing on in the water, a bit like trying to balance a pencil on yourfinger. in bit like trying to balance a pencil on your finger. in order to keep it upright you have to do a lot of this and that is what this but is having to do. having to adjust its position hundreds of times a second to keep it perfectly balanced. you could not do that manually so this thing is covered in sensors that monitor exactly what the orientation is in the computers are doing the compensation and they do that by adjusting the angle of the wings in the water. again, hundreds of a second, to keep a
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perfectly balanced. it is the same reason why drones are able to stay stable in the area and on these early test flights, christian is able to tweet and experiment with the boat behaviour by changing the settings live on his laptop. we are turning... 0ne settings live on his laptop. we are turning... one of the things you can do when you are precisely controlling the orientation of the boat all the time is you can artificially bank like this when you are turning which is more comfortable for the passengers. because of the boat was to remain level, everybody would be pushed to one side so the banking is artificial. there is a limit to the size of the swell this type of craft can cope with but in inland waterways this technology may very well soon be making waves, by not making waves...! although like a lot of modern life, the smooth ride will depend on the computers and sensors doing theirjobs at all times, which is no mean feat.
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why has nobody made an electric hydrofoil flying ferry before? i think the main reason is it is very hard! 0ver over 70 countries have commitments to net—zero targets. some are enshrined in and others are golf laid out in policy. large companies have also made net zero pages but how do we know that they are being met? there is one company that might have the answer. satellites have been capturing images from space, for decades. this is a radar one here and you also have optical images
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like these and any cloud cover around you will not see what is going on beneath and you need daylight for most of these. but satellite view has a different plan, for them, satellite view has a different plan, forthem, it satellite view has a different plan, for them, it is about thermal imaging. it's first satellite was launched injune on the spacex rocket flying out of california. it started sending back high—resolution images to earth, its thermal sensors enabling it to chase hot and cold features down to 3.5 metre accuracy. cold features down to 3.5 metre accura . . , . cold features down to 3.5 metre accura . ., , . , accuracy. that cycle, there is accuracy. that cycle, there is a lot more — accuracy. that cycle, there is a lot more than _ accuracy. that cycle, there is a lot more than four - a lot more than four kilometres. it a lot more than four kilometres.- kilometres. it is the culmination - kilometres. it is the culmination of - kilometres. it is the j culmination of years kilometres. it is the i culmination of years of kilometres. it is the - culmination of years of work. we have satellite view, the world's thermometer and these are literally the raw images and within ranil wickremesinghe
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the better. here, the first image we took was of row and you can see the hot areas in brighter colours and the blue areas are the cooler areas in the city. this one is taken at night and what you can seize the vatican is very, very hot. this summer, there were big heatwaves, that building absorbed a lot of energy and at night it is radiating. the absorbed a lot of energy and at night it is radiating.— night it is radiating. the heat which are _ night it is radiating. the heat which are still— night it is radiating. the heat which are still images - night it is radiating. the heat which are still images in - night it is radiating. the heat| which are still images in short images and videos could have wide application but a particularly useful in climate related matters. irate particularly useful in climate related matters.— particularly useful in climate related matters. we think every city would _ related matters. we think every city would want _ related matters. we think every city would want this, _ related matters. we think every city would want this, i _ related matters. we think every city would want this, i knew - city would want this, i knew city would want this, i knew city manager called chief heat offices, seven appointed around the world and one is in athens for example. and they are wanting his data so they can go and help people keep the city call like to keep the stress on people less and save energy.
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but the bigger picture is to help monitor how companies are meeting their net zero commitments.- meeting their net zero commitments. ., ., commitments. you can look at oil storage. — commitments. you can look at oil storage, for _ commitments. you can look at oil storage, for example - commitments. you can look at oil storage, for example and i oil storage, for example and see how much fossil fuels are being burnt and how much are being burnt and how much are being pumped. when people are declaring net zero or reducing their oil consumption, we can come and verify that that is actually occurring. est} actually occurring. 60 organisations - actually occurring. 60 organisations are - actually occurring. 60 organisations are currently playing around with these early heat images to see if they can improve their existing climate models. hot that one was assembled by satellite technology in guildford. we get one shot at launching something like this are how stressful is the process?— like this are how stressful is the process? pretty stressful! i think it the process? pretty stressful! i think it is — the process? pretty stressful! i think it is a _ the process? pretty stressful! i think it is a high _ the process? pretty stressful! i think it is a high intensity - i think it is a high intensity business. especially projects like this that are very short schedule but it is very exciting when it does launch. seven more satellites will be joining hot sat one over the
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next few months. the aim is to increase the amount of data being collected, identifying temperature profiles of individual buildings, offices and factories. irate individual buildings, offices and factories.— individual buildings, offices and factories. we are striving to help the — and factories. we are striving to help the planet, _ and factories. we are striving to help the planet, striving i and factories. we are striving| to help the planet, striving to get to net zero, you need is transparency and information. and we're doing it.— and we're doing it. time for a look at this — and we're doing it. time for a look at this week's _ and we're doing it. time for a look at this week's tech - and we're doing it. time for a | look at this week's tech news. 0penai co—founder sam aubin is returning to the company days after he was ousted. his sacking astonished many and lead to staff threatening mass resignations until he was reinstated. the battle of the top of 0penai began when the original board decided to remove him, saying he had lost — they had lost confidence in leadership. finance chief executive has resigned after pleading guilty in to money laundering. the usjustice
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laundering. the us justice department laundering. the usjustice department that the worlds biggest cryptocurrency exchange had helped users bypass sanctions. it has ordered the firm to pay for your $.3 billion in penalties and forfeitures. he said he made mistakes and stepping down with the best move for the company. scientists in scotland are using robotics soft gliders to take a system of ocean currents for signs of climate change. they are monitoring the conveyor belt which regulates global temperatures by carrying warm and cool area around the world. there is some concern the system weakening. these . uides the system weakening. these guides really _ the system weakening. these guides really help _ the system weakening. these guides really help us - the system weakening. these guides really help us go - the system weakening. these guides really help us go to . guides really help us go to places we would not really get to in the winter and they can stay out for months at a time whereas on a ship you a time—limited. food wastage is a huge problem across the globe and in india this is compounded by the fact
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that cold storage facilities can be few and far between. 0ne can be few and far between. one of this is earth shot prize winners is a start—up working on a solution. we went to find out more. there is a shocking statistic. more than one third of all fruit and vegetables grown in india and up in landfill like these. but across some 400 villages in the western part of the country, these solar powered dryers all operated by women are now tackling the challenge head—on. these are built by a start—up that won the prestigious earth shot prize for climate impact this year. this isn't exactly a high—tech device that or with any complex technology, electronics or chips but these dryers expand the life—cycle of
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basic perishables like onions for instance or tomatoes that would otherwise have rotted. it is a frugal, low cost climate friendly solution to preserving second rate produce that normally does not find a market. they are also a cheap tentative to expensive cold storage facilities, few and far between in these rural areas. she is one of the cofounders of the start—up that makes these dryers. can you explain how this works?— dryers. can you explain how this works? we use the solar ener: this works? we use the solar energy to — this works? we use the solar energy to convert _ this works? we use the solar energy to convert the - this works? we use the solar energy to convert the heat i this works? we use the solar. energy to convert the heat and the heat to the product, when we say about the heat, the heat is from an insulator surface, it is giving the heat from the bottom to the product in the air enters from this aspect, we close the dry and it carries the moisture from the driver and carries the solar radiation falling from the top surface on
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the product and all this helps to remove the moisture from the product. to remove the moisture from the roduct. , . ., ., , product. keeping the technology sim - le product. keeping the technology simple and _ product. keeping the technology simple and low-cost _ product. keeping the technology simple and low-cost has - product. keeping the technology j simple and low-cost has allowed simple and low—cost has allowed them to on—board thousands of women entrepreneurs to do this job. it has been a game changer for the localfarmers. at job. it has been a game changer for the local farmers. at the crack of dawn this woman is sorting the onion harvest to be sent to the drying facility. 0nion prices are very volatile. in the cost of transport is more than the cost of production i used tojust more than the cost of production i used to just throw away the crop, many times the lower grade crop would not get sold, half of what i had grown wood rot. now all of it gets picked up at the farm gate in my income has gone up substantially.— my income has gone up substantially. my income has gone up substantiall . . substantially. once tried the roduce substantially. once tried the produce comes _ substantially. once tried the produce comes to _ substantially. once tried the produce comes to this - substantially. once tried the l produce comes to this factory. which processes it further into packaged food that is sold to big companies and restaurants.
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the farm to factory chain gives growers an assured market and helps cut middlemen. can you talk about about the various levels you are creating impact? we are creating impact at three levels, food wastage, we are reducing food wastage by turning it to value added products. we are giving these dryers most of the dryer is 100% were used by the women in the women farmers in the third one is the carbon emissions as this is the best technology so we are reducing on the carbon emissions. we have 2000 women farmers three years time we could teach 13,000 women farmers, the farmers network we are building is a direct or indirect farmers network we can see 1 indirect farmers network we can see1 million farmers indirect farmers network we can see 1 million farmers getting an impact. see 1 million farmers getting an impact-— an impact. india is vast and diverse- — an impact. india is vast and diverse. identifying - an impact. india is vast and diverse. identifying the - an impact. india is vast and l diverse. identifying the right produce in the right geography
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and creating a market for it is and creating a market for it is a challenge. but solutions like these if scaled up can help millions of india's tourist farmers reduce waste and grow their incomes. in the race to reduce emissions plans to build wind farms but while the electricity they has a and out the race is on to try as adrian murray is these towering machines are getting nowhere it is the latest and biggest turbines they have, the prototypes, this is like seeing
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and tasting the future right here. . , and tasting the future right here. ., , , ::j~ , here. the largest is 208 metres hith is here. the largest is 208 metres high is broken _ here. the largest is 208 metres high is broken world _ here. the largest is 208 metres high is broken world records - high is broken world records for the most power.- high is broken world records for the most power. experts say the are for the most power. experts say they are only — for the most power. experts say they are only getting _ for the most power. experts say they are only getting bigger. - they are only getting bigger. this race towards bigger and bigger turbines will continue for a while more. we are looking into the possibility of creating a new test centre in denmark and the design of turbine we are designing for is 50 metres from ground to hi tip. in 50 metres from ground to hi ti ._ :: ,': z: 50 metres from ground to hi ti. ::;~,:: tip. in 2030 wind power could su -l tip. in 2030 wind power could supply the — tip. in 2030 wind power could supply the fifth _ tip. in 2030 wind power could supply the fifth of _ tip. in 2030 wind power could supply the fifth of the - tip. in 2030 wind power could supply the fifth of the world l supply the fifth of the world �*s electricity, we need clean energy but the screen industry has a growing headache. when it comes to waste. turbines are built to withstand the forces of nature, they are flexible, light and superstrong. but that is also where the problem lies. when they reach the end of life they are ready difficult to recycle. while the steel and
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the towers can be reused the massive blades are almost indestructible. and as older models are replaced, many get dumped in landfill. by 2050, there could be 43 million tons of redundant blades globally that need to be dealt with. it is problematic because we want the renewable energy to be truly sustainable, and if you have a waste material that goes to landfill it is not truly sustainable.— to landfill it is not truly sustainable. �*, ., , sustainable. it's a problem -la ers sustainable. it's a problem players have _ sustainable. it's a problem players have been - sustainable. it's a problem i players have been scrambling sustainable. it's a problem - players have been scrambling to figure out. and we might now have some answers. there have been creative ways of reusing wind turbine blade stop like this bike shed. they have even been repurposed for playgrounds, bridges and building cladding. but this will not ready tackle growing volumes. the immediate solution
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is to chop up and finding through them, it is burned as fuel and used as an ingredient or cement production. this plant has already handled more than three and half thousand unwanted blades. now turbine makers siemens have had a breakthrough at its zone. it manufactures some of the world's biggest blade edit site here. and while this one is like any other, it can be recycled. it all comes down to a reason called epoxy which acts like a strong superglue binding together the fibreglass, usually this is incredibly tough to break down. but not here. ihie incredibly tough to break down. but not here.— but not here. we change something _ but not here. we change something in _ but not here. we change something in the - but not here. we change l something in the backbone but not here. we change - something in the backbone of the chemistry, this has gone through our recycling process, turnit through our recycling process, turn it around. you can see all
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the different he is placed through the production of the blade and they are separating from the blade. to blade and they are separating from the blade.— from the blade. to do that it needs to _ from the blade. to do that it needs to be _ from the blade. to do that it needs to be bathed - from the blade. to do that it needs to be bathed in - from the blade. to do that it needs to be bathed in a - from the blade. to do that it needs to be bathed in a big. needs to be bathed in a big bath of mild acetic acid. after a few hours — bath of mild acetic acid. after a few hours at _ bath of mild acetic acid. after a few hours at 80 _ bath of mild acetic acid. after a few hours at 80 celsius - bath of mild acetic acid. after a few hours at 80 celsius you | a few hours at 80 celsius you get the result is here. just like you — get the result is here. just like you would _ get the result is here. just like you would make - get the result is here. just like you would make there is at a supermarket. there is a scent of vinegar coming from the blade. this will not tackle today's raised but when these blades retire the materials could go into making other things. could go into making other thins. ~ could go into making other thins. . _, could go into making other thins. ~ , things. we could be furniture, suitcases. _ things. we could be furniture, suitcases, you _ things. we could be furniture, suitcases, you can _ things. we could be furniture, suitcases, you can use - things. we could be furniture, suitcases, you can use it - things. we could be furniture, suitcases, you can use it for i suitcases, you can use it for surfboard, general consumer goods. surfboard, general consumer toods. �* ., , goods. but not new turbines? not as it is — goods. but not new turbines? not as it is right _ goods. but not new turbines? not as it is right now - goods. but not new turbines? not as it is right now but - goods. but not new turbines? not as it is right now but i - goods. but not new turbines? not as it is right now but i am never going to say never. so far only a _ never going to say never. so far only a small number had been installed but they will now be used for big offshore projects here in europe. at
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this research laboratory scientists are taking a different approach. this was a art of a different approach. this was a part of a wintertime _ different approach. this was a part of a wintertime that - different approach. this was a part of a wintertime that was | part of a wintertime that was decommissioned, you put the tip there and you add a catalyst. they have discovered a chemical process that gently breaks apart the components. precise details are still under wraps but it turns out is relatively simple. but it turns out is relatively sim - le. , but it turns out is relatively simle. , ., ., ,, simple. these are the glass fibres which _ simple. these are the glass fibres which have _ simple. these are the glass fibres which have come - simple. these are the glass. fibres which have come apart simple. these are the glass i fibres which have come apart a little bit. they are not bound to get anymore. it little bit. they are not bound to get anymore.— to get anymore. it is very clearly separated - to get anymore. it is very clearly separated into i clearly separated into different components. that means the fibres and even the type epoxy resin could be recovered and potentially reused. , reused. this has been quite remarkable, _ reused. this has been quite remarkable, we _ reused. this has been quite remarkable, we thought i reused. this has been quite i remarkable, we thought these materials were extremely strong and indestructible, now we found the chemical processing can chew its way through the epoxy. can chew its way through the e ox . �* ., y can chew its way through the eox . �* ., , epoxy. and, in theory it could work on all — epoxy. and, in theory it could work on all kinds _ epoxy. and, in theory it could work on all kinds of _ epoxy. and, in theory it could work on all kinds of turbine i work on all kinds of turbine blades, already out there. what
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we find exciting _ blades, already out there. what we find exciting as _ blades, already out there. what we find exciting as we _ blades, already out there. what we find exciting as we are i blades, already out there. twist we find exciting as we are the first to be able to do that, there are potential recycling such tough materials not only confined to the wind turbine industry, there is the aeronautic industry, space industry, cars.— aeronautic industry, space industry, cars. this technology still needs _ industry, cars. this technology still needs to _ industry, cars. this technology still needs to make _ industry, cars. this technology still needs to make a - industry, cars. this technology still needs to make a leap i industry, cars. this technology| still needs to make a leap from a test tube to the real world. but, with new solutions on the table, perhaps this growing waste problem could be headed off before it gets too big. and that's it for our round—up of some of the latest sustainability stories. hope you have enjoyed them. from sweden and me and my electric ferry, thank you for watching. and i wonder what this does.
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hello. the cold and crisp weather is here to stay — for a little while, at least. we might see the temperatures rise temporarily through the course of sunday into monday but i think on the whole, the next 7—10 days below average for the time of the year. so, here's the forecast, then, and starting with sunday, you can see the blue colours there — that's the cold air over us — but temporarily, as i said, a little bit of mild air sneaks in with this weather system here. so, early on sunday, a weather front approaches. thicker cloud and some outbreaks of rain. so, it does mean that all of that crisp sunshine we will have had on saturday will be replaced with the cloudier skies and slightly milder conditions out towards the west. so ten in belfast, the western fringes of wales, maybe into double figures, 13 in plymouth, but across the rest of the country it's still pretty cold — say, 6—9 degrees celsius. and then, through sunday into monday, that low pressure moves across the uk so, yes, some outbreaks of rain
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heading our way and actually, not a particularly pleasant monday on the way at all across england and wales with the thick cloud and some outbreaks of rain. but notice as the centre of this low here pulls away on the western side of it, we've got the winds returning from the north again so, i think once again, we'll see those temperatures dropping nationwide. and then monday night into tuesday, that low pulls away into more central parts of europe. we're in between weather systems once again and the cold air is over us. i mean, it's not desperately cold air. it can, of course, get a lot colder in our climate this time of the year, but it's certainly chilly enough and after that really mild autumn we've had, we are feeling the effects, for sure — at least, relatively speaking. so, some maybe wintry showers across the north and the north—east of scotland on tuesday, carried by that northerly breeze. single—figure temperatures pretty much across the board after a frosty start
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on tuesday. and then, tuesday into wednesday, again, another little area of low pressure sneaks in. perhaps increasing amounts of cloud. perhaps the temperatures will pick up a little bit. so, each time we see areas of low pressure coming in, they cut off the supply of colder air and those temperatures nudge back up, but only by a fraction, so we're not really seeing that push of particularly mild weather from the south or the south—west — it's either coming in from the north or slightly north of west, if you know what i mean. and then, wednesday into thursday, yes, low pressure is sitting on top of us. that does mean rather a lot of cloud. there is even just the chance of a little bit of wintriness across the welsh hills, maybe salisbury plain. i mean, this is really detail here now into thursday and it could change. in fact, these blobs of blue and even the wintriness will be probably in different locations as the next computer model runs are released. so, the outlook, then, shows this pressure pattern,
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the isobars pointing in from north to south. that is an indication of where our air�*s going to be coming from and it does look as though it'll be generally coming in from the north, so those temperatures will remain on the cold side. so, here's an outlook for end of next week and even into the following weekend there. you can see staying on the cold side in the south, around five degrees celsius and, actually, about the same further north, too. that's it for me. bye—bye.
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this is bbc news. a moment ofjoy as 9—year—old emily hand is reunited with her father. she'd been abducted during a sleepover at a libbutz. she was part of a second exchange of hostages for prisoners between israel and hamas. 13 israelis and 4 thai nationals have been freed. celebrations in the west bank as 39 more palestinians were released from israeli prisons. some have been in detention for years.
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hello. hamas has freed another 13 israelis who were taken hostage during the attacks on october 7th. they are all women, teenagers and young children. four thai nationals were also released. 39 palestinians have been freed from israeli jails in response. the handover was delayed for hours by a dispute about whether israel was abiding by the terms of the deal which had been reached with hamas. israel says it has received the list of a third group of hostages, to be released on sunday. among the hostages released is the irish—israeli girl emily hand who's nine years old. emily was initially thought to have been among those killed in the attack on kibbutz be'eri on october 7. this is the moment she was reunited with her father, tom. emily was at a sleepover at a friend's house on the kibbutz when she was abducted without any
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